Category Archives: Combination

The Patchwork Bike

The Patchwork Bike” 

In the book, The Patchwork Bike, siblings make their own fun by building a bike from scratch.

Using a hodgepodge of scavenged items, they assemble their bike and ride it through their village and their mud-for-walls home.

Lyrical language and powerful illustrations create an evocative story.

This story promotes creative components of diversity, resourceful, imagination, and inventiveness.

WHY I LIKE THIS BOOK: I like this book because the marriage of text and perfectly evoke the joy of riding a bike and capturing readers’ imagination. The title immediately piqued my curiosity, and I wondered how could a bike be patchwork. I enjoyed the author’s lyrical language such as shicketty shake and winketty wonk.

TITLE: The Patchwork Bike

AUTHOR: Maxine Beneba Clarke

ILLUSTRATOR: Van Thanh Rudd

PUBLISHER: Candlewick Press, 2018

AGE GROUP: 3-6

TOPIC(S): recycled materials, culture, siblings, bike riding

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: diversity, resourceful, imagination, inventiveness

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Hodgepodge, a synonym for patchwork, is defined as being composed of parts of different kinds. Basically, it is an assortment of different things that do not originally go together but are assembled together to create a final product. What can you make? Gather different items. Take apart the larger items (with permission) into smaller parts. Looking at these various parts, what can you make to create a hodgepodge machine? What is the function(s) of your machine? Build your machine. Name your machine.

2) Design a bike that reflects your personality. Conduct research on different types of bicycles. Remember to look at past bikes, recent bikes, and even bikes of the future to inspire your design.

3) Illustrator Van Thanh Rudd painted on recycled cardboard for the book’s illustrations. Try your hand at painting on cardboard. How is it different from painting on paper? Why do you think the illustrator used cardboard?

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Maxine Beneba Clarke, visit:

https://www.hachette.com.au/maxine-beneba-clarke/

To learn more about illustrator Van Thanh Rudd, visit:

https://www.van-t-rudd.net/illustration.html

Drawn from Nature

Drawn from Nature”

Drawn from Nature, a beautifully crafted nonfiction picture book, combines illustrative text and artwork. Travel through a year of changing seasons with Helen Ahpornsiri’s art of transformed leaves, petals, and seeds into newly hatched ducklings, nut stashing squirrels, and bud-studded trees.

 

This story promotes creative components of nature, imagination, unique, parts to whole, and combination.

WHY I LIKE THIS BOOK:  As a fan of arranging items in an unexpected way, I appreciate Helen Ahpornsiri’s ability to envision the placement of pressed flowers and leaves to masterfully create animals. Her intricate artwork combined with interesting, in-depth explanations of nature, animals, and the seasons makes for a beautifully informative children’s book.

TITLE: Drawn From Nature

ILLUSTRATOR: Helen Ahpornsiri

PUBLISHER: Big Picture Press, 2018

AGE GROUP: 6-9

THEME(S)/TOPICS: nature, seasons, shapes

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: nature, imagination, combination, unique, parts to whole

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) What is your favorite season? List 10 reasons why it’s your favorite season. Use these reasons to create a song or poem that describes your season. In your song or poem, do not use the word of your chosen season. Instead, see if someone can guess what season you are writing about.

2) 

Illustrator Artist Helen Ahpornsiri uses white space to evoke wonder within her collages. What do you imagine when you see this owl?

3) Illustrator Artist Helen Ahpornsiri uses real flowers and foliage, which are foraged or grown, then preserved with traditional flower-pressing methods to create her art. To create a collage, pick an animal that lives in or near your town. Next, choose an unusual medium such as pasta noodles, beans, or pebbles. Sort out the different shapes and colors of your medium. Sketch out your animal design. Using your medium, arrange and rearrange pieces to create your animal collage.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about illustrator Helen Ahpornsiri, visit:

http://helenahpornsiri.com

To learn more about Helen Ahpornsiri’s art process, visit:

https://helenahpornsiri.com/about/

Creative Thinking Prompt: Create a New Basket Design

Creative Thinking Prompt: Create a New Basket Design

Catriona Pollard – “Sowing New Seeds” www.TheArtofWeaving.com.au

Creative thinkers sometimes take what someone else has done and think about ways it can be improved. Australian fiber artist, Catriona Pollard takes natural weaving materials to create art. Her baskets connect people to nature. When working with foraged and discarded plant material, she “listens” to the material, weaving and shaping it into what it wants to be to create her unique organic sculptures.

Creative Thinking Prompt: Create a New Basket Design

First, think about the purpose of a basket. Is used to hold things, to carry things, or to be home to an animal? Brainstorm other ways a basket can be used. Will it hang from a wall? Will someone use it? From your list, pick one purpose.

Second, make a list of different materials that can a basket can be made from. Choose one material to use when creating your basket.

Third, think about how you can make your basket unique. Remember it needs to achieve its purpose.

Fourth, sketch out your design.

Fifth, gather materials you will need and begin to create your basket. Don’t worry if your design does not work at first. Sometimes it takes several tries and revision before it works. Your design may take on a different approach than what you originally thought and that is okay.

Sixth, elaborate on your basket design. What embellishments or decorations would you like to add (or not add)? What can be added or taken away to improve your basket’s function?

Seventh, proudly use and display your basket.

You can also use this creative thinking technique called Scamper to help you design your basket.

S = Substitute:  Remove some part and replace it with something else.

C = Combination:  Join or force together two or more elements of your subject to develop a solution.

A = Adapt:  Change some part so that it works where before it didn’t work.

M = Magnify or modify:  Consider the attributes of the subject and change them. Attributes include: size, shape, other dimensions, texture, color, position, etc.

P = Put to other uses:  Think about your subject – why it exists, what it is used for, what it’s supposed to do. Then think up new and unusual purposes.           

E = Eliminate:  Remove any or all elements of the subject to find another solution.

R = Rearrange or reverse:  Look at the subject from different perspectives. Turn it upside-down, inside-out. Make it go backwards, against the direction it was intended to go or be used. Similar to Reverse, modify the order of operations or any other hierarchy involved.

EXTENDED CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about Catriona Pollard and her creative process, visit: http://www.catrionapollard.com/art/  and watch this short video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZHySibDdoA

To practice your weaving skills, create an easy paper basket: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NX2Tw40K5DY