Category Archives: Originality

Poetree

Poetree”

Each season is introduced with a rhyming couplet. 

Followed by acrostic poems that inspire wonder about the seasons.

Illustrations bring readers into this seasonal world. 

This story promotes creative components of imagination, originality, nature, and flexible thinking.

WHY I LIKE THIS BOOK: I like this book because the poems are written in kid-friendly language that shows originality about a commonly written topic. 

TITLE:Poetree

POEMS by: Caroline Pignat

ILLUSTRATOR: Francois Thisdale

PUBLISHER: Red Deer Press, 2018

AGE GROUP: 5-7

TOPIC(S): changing seasons, poetry

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: imagination, flexible thinking, originality, nature

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) What is your favorite season? Using your senses, make a table-list of things that show that season. 

SEASON: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

TasteSmellSightTouchHear
     
     
     
     
     

From your table-list, pick words to create an image of your season by drawing a picture and “hiding” your words in your picture.

2) Seasons change and so do you. Think about what new things you learned or did during the last year. What new thing(s) did you learn or do in Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall? 

3) An acrostic poem is where the first, last or other letters in a line spell out a word. Pick a seasonal word to write an acrostic poem.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about poet Caroline Pignat, visit:

https://www.carolinepignat.com/caroline.html

To learn more about illustrator Francois Thisdale, visit:

https://www.thisdale.com/bio_e.htm

Knock Knock

“Knock Knock”

In the book, Knock Knock, joke telling is the story teller. As Bear is getting ready for bed, his friends keep knocking on his door interrupting Bear’s plans for hibernation.

With each knock, Bear becomes more and more annoyed until Al knocks on his door and a surprise unfolds.

This story promotes creative components of humor and originality. 

WHY I LIKE THIS BOOK: I like this book because of how the author combined two things that don’t usually go together – jokes and bears, to produce a humorous story about hibernation. Additionally, the full-of-life illustrations depict vibrant characters that lend another layer of storytelling.

TITLE: Knock Knock

AUTHOR: Tammi Sauer

ILLUSTRATOR: Guy Francis

PUBLISHER: Scholastic Press, 2018

AGE GROUP: 4-7

TOPIC(S): friendship, jokes, hibernation

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: humor, originality

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Invent your own knock, knock jokes about another animal who hibernates.

2) Create more knock, knock jokes with your friends to make a joke book. Here is a joke of mine: Knock, knock. Who’s there? Ida. Ida, who? Ida wanna do my homework.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Tammi Sauer, visit:

http://www.tammisauer.com/about-me

To learn more about illustrator Guy Francis, visit:

http://www.guyfrancis.com/Kactiguy/Home.html

Snow Music

Snow Music”

Do you hear it? 

Peht. 

Peht. 

Peht. 

Snow is falling. 

Follow a deer and a lost then found dog as they wander through this musical snow-covered world in Snow Music. 

Author/illustrator Lynne Rae Perkins creates music bars for snowballs, dog tags, and snow plows that tickle the imagination. 

Sing along as if you were in the car slushing through the snow.

This story promotes creative components of originality and imagination.

WHY I LIKE THIS BOOK: I like this book for how the author/illustrator immerses and interacts with the reader to bring the reader into this musical snowy world in such an original way.

TITLE:Snow Music

AUTHOR: Lynne Rae Perkins

ILLUSTRATOR: Lynne Rae Perkins

PUBLISHER: Greenwillow Books, 2000

AGE GROUP: 3-6

TOPIC(S): rhyme, snow, music

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: imagination, originality

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) What sounds do you hear in your neighborhood when snow is falling? What sounds do you hear in your neighborhood when snow is melting? Using onomatopoeia to describe your sounds, have someone guess what makes that sound?  Onomatopoeia is a word created from the sound it is describing. For example, sniff sounds like when someone sniffs through his nose.

2) Sing along to a song about snow.

3) What would the sound of snow falling sound like to a deer or rabbit whose ears are shaped definitely than human ears?

4) Like the author/illustrator did in the story, write music bars for the things related to winter activities such as skiing, ice skating, or sledding.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Lynne Rae Perkins, visit: