Category Archives: Creative Process

Creative Thinking Prompt: Ambigram Name

Creative Thinking Prompt: Invent your own font. Use this font to create an ambigram with your name.

Font is a design for a set of characters such as the alphabet using different sizes, italic, and bold. Typeface defines the shape of each character like when we use Arial and Comic Sans to add personality to our letters.

An ambigram is a word that is able to be interpreted from a different direction or perspective. Often used in graphic design, ambigrams play with optical illusions, symmetry and visual perception that include rotational, reflective, and 3-dimensional. A popular ambigram is when flipped horizontally or vertically, it still means the same.

Steps on how to make your own ambigram, visit:

https://designshack.net/articles/graphics/how-to-design-an-ambigram/

Creative Thinking Prompt: Colorforms® – A Timeless Toy

Creative Thinking Prompt: Colorforms® – A Timeless Toy

Since the 1950s, Colorforms® has been inspiring the imaginations of children. Back in 1951, two art students, Harry and Patricia Kislevitz, experimented with a new medium, a flexible vinyl material to use instead of paint. They bought rolls of colorful vinyl, cut out geometric shapes and stuck them to the walls of their bathroom. When guests came over to visit, they added to the Harry and Patricia’s bathroom art creation.

To learn more about Colorforms®, visit:

http://www.colorforms.com/history/

http://www.colorforms.com/videos/

The Invention Process

Step 1: Choose a problem

Step 2: Brainstorm solutions

Step 3: Background research

Step 4: Design and build

Step 5: Test and revise

Creative Thinking Prompt: Using the invention process, invent a new imagination game. After you design and build, have others play your game. What did they like about it? What did they think could be improved? Go back to the drawing board and revise your game again and again, trying out new ideas. What steps and risks did you take to invent something new? Good for you! Pat yourself on the back for persisting and trying something new!

Creative Thinking Prompt: I See You

Creative Thinking Prompt: I See You

  First, brainstorm different ways that “I see you” can be interpreted.

 Second, combine.

Select from your list a few ways and combine them. Play around with these combinations. Have fun!

  Third, evaluate.

Which combination is most unusual? Which one creates emotion or an “aha” moment? Which one is “boring”? Which one has humor? Can a trait from one be substituted for a trait in another combination? Has you seen this done before? If so, how can you make it original?

 Fourth, elaborate.

Add details to your combination. Extend it.

These are some of my thoughts and where they led as I went through the creative process.

A) eyeball art; play on words I Sea You->  an image of the ocean in the iris of an eye

B) graffiti art; font; text message ICU ->  could mean an emergency room or combine with graffiti art to create images within the letters of ICU to create meaning for I See You

C) body movement; sign language ->  through a telescope or binoculars is an image of you in the sea

 Creative Thinking Prompt: How many ways can you create meaning for “I See You”?

Creative Thinking Prompt: Wizard of Oz

Creative Thinking Prompt: Wizard of Oz

Create an alternate storyline for Dorothy and the Wizard.

Pretend you are Dorothy and you are traveling the yellow brick road to see the wizard. The road isn’t yellow, it’s ______ (color) and it’s made of ________. Why do you need to see the Wizard? As you travel you come across four travelers: ___________, ______________, ____________, and _________ who also need to see the Wizard. Why do they need to see the Wizard? When you meet the Wizard, what does she/he look like? What power does the Wizard have to grant your wish? Will your wish be granted? If not, what happens next? If yes, what happens next?

OR

What if Dorothy and the Wizard switch places and the Wizard visits Dorothy because she has the power to grant wishes?

DIZZY

Dizzy

Dizzy, a picture book biography, “is the story of one real cool cat who must have been born with a horn in his hands…” Dizzy Gillespie, born poor and often beat up by other kids, re-channeled his anger into playing the trumpet given to him by his music teacher. As he grew older, Dizzy refused to follow the rules of music. He clowned around, added notes to songs, played never-been-heard notes, and always puffed out his cheeks when playing his trumpet. Dizzy had created a new kind of music – BEBOP.

This story is written like a jazz song with LOUD and s t a c c a t o beats, short lines, long lines and more, so the reader can feel the rhythm as seen in the illustration below.

This book promotes individuality, inventor, creative person, risk-taker, unique, and following one’s heart.

TITLE: Dizzy

AUTHOR: Jonah Winter

ILLUSTRATOR: Sean Qualls

PUBLISHER: Arthur A. Levine Books, 2006

AGE GROUP: 6-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: individuality, inventor, creative person, risk-taker, unique, following one’s heart

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) What are you passionate about? Do you feel like you can’t live without it? If you couldn’t pursue your passion, what would you do instead?

2) How do you express yourself creatively?

3) Whether or not you play instrument, what instrument do you like the sound of the most? What instrument do you like the structure and shape of the most?

4)

Notice how the illustrator uses color and thick brush strokes to convey the energy and tone of Dizzy’s music. Paint how you feel when you are doing something you love and then paint how you feel when you are doing something you don’t like.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Jonah Winter, visit:

http://www.jonahwinter.com

To learn more about illustrator Sean Qualls, visit:

http://seanqualls.com

Creative Thinking Prompt: Paper Fish

Creative Thinking Prompt: Paper Fish

While thinking about a new story character, I surfed the web looking at images of paper fish. While creating fish from paper isn’t a new concept, I wanted to see what others had done and how that might inspire me.

I discovered Easy Peasy and Fun’s website and The Crafty Mom at YouTube. Using their easy tutorials, I made two fish creations.

A shark bookmark that looks like he is eating the corner of my book.

         

www.easypeasyandfun.com/shark-corner-bookmark

An accordion fish that looks like it moves.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-l0tT9PVadQ

Use the examples above to inspire your own unique fish creations. What types of fish can you create from paper and glue? Make your fish into storybook characters. Make a paper aquarium for your fish.

Creative Thinking Prompt: Building with Ice Cubes

Ice is slippery. Ice is wet. Ice melts. Then how can you build with ice?

Creative Thinking Prompt: Build a structure using ice cubes, using the creative thinking strategy SCAMPER. SCAMPER was developed by Bob Eberle based upon Alex Osborn’s creating thinking questions. Alex Osborn is the originator of brainstorming.

SCAMPER

Scamper is based upon seven creative thinking principles. Each principle views your idea in a different manner. By asking questions related to each principle, Scamper gets you thinking about which areas of your idea you can improve.

S = Substitute:  Remove some part and replace it with something else.

What else can I use instead of clear water to create ice cubes?

C = Combination:  Join or force together two or more elements of your subject to develop a solution.

What things can I combine together to make a better ice cube?

What can I use to stick the cubes together?

A = Adapt:  Change some part so that it works where before it didn’t work.

What might I do to change the structure of the ice cubes to make them not melt quickly?

M = Magnify or modify:  Consider the attributes of the subject and change them. Attributes include: size, shape, other dimensions, texture, color, position, etc.

How will smaller or larger ice cubes work within my structure?

P = Put to other uses:  Think about your subject – why it exists, what it is used for, what it’s supposed to do. Then think up new and unusual purposes.           

How else can I use an ice cube?

E = Eliminate:  Remove any or all elements of the subject.

What can I remove from my structure to make it stronger and last longer?

R = Rearrange or reverse:  Look at the subject from different perspectives. Turn it upside-down, inside-out. Make it go backwards, against the direction it was intended to go or be used. Similar to Reverse, modify the order of operations or any other hierarchy involved.

What would happen if I rearrange the ice cubes in my structure?

As I used SCAMPER more questions popped into my mind.

  • How would using pop, sugar water, jello, or millk affect the structure of an ice cube?
  • Would the different ingredients make the cube stick together easier? Would it melt less?
  • What if I let the cubes melt a little and then refreeze them – would my structure “stick” together?
  • How would small and large cubes help with building my structure?
  • Is there a better way to build an ice structure?
  • What if I froze a smaller cube inside a larger cube?
  • How can I make my structure colorful?

To make glow-in-the-dark cubes, visit: http://www.learnplayimagine.com/2012/02/glow-in-dark-water-beads.html

Think Deeper: Build an ice cube arch.

The Most Magnificent Thing

“The Most Magnificent Thing

One day a girl has a wonderful idea to make the most magnificent thing. She knows how it will look and how it will work. After she makes it, it doesn’t look or work how she imagined.

She tries again and again but it still won’t work. It isn’t magnificent.

Frustrated and angry, she quits. Her trusty helper tells her to go for a walk.

When they return, she sees all the things she created. Each one better than before. That gives her an idea…

This book promotes discovery, the creative process, and risk-taking.

TITLE: The Most Magnificent Thing

AUTHOR: Ashley Spires

ILLUSTRATOR: Ashley Spires

PUBLISHER: Kids Can Press, 2014

AGE GROUP: 6-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: discovery, the creative process, risk-taking

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Pick an invention that interests you. What might you change to make it better? What might you add or subtract from it? Can you substitute a different part? What else can the invention be used for?

2) What do you do when you are frustrated? Do you quit, give up? Do you push forward and try again? Do you try a new approach? Tell about a time that you wanted to quit but you didn’t.

 EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Ashley Spires, visit:

https://www.ashleyspires.com/index.html

Creative Thinking Prompt: What Can You Make With Bubble Gum?

Gum Sculpture by Maurizio Savini

12-16-16 Creative Thinking Prompt: What Can You Make With Bubble Gum?

Sculptures are made from a variety of materials – clay, wire, paper. But have you seen one made from bubble gum? Italian artist Maurizio Savini uses pink and white gum as his art medium because he sees it as part of his country’s culture.

Gum Sculpture by Maurizio Savini

No, he does not chew the gum. To keep his sculptures from disintegrating from the gum’s sugar, Savini applies a mixture of formaldehyde and antibiotics to preserve his work.

Creative Thinking Prompt: What can you make with gum? Brainstorm a list of things that you can use or make with bubble gum. Grab some gum. Work with it using your hands to get the feel of the gum and to understand its properties. Sketch out a simple design that you’d like to make. Now create! Remember your piece might not last long due to the gum’s sugar.

To view more of Maurizio Savini’s work, visit:

http://blog.keralites.net/2012/02/chewing-gum-art.html

To learn more about Maurizio Savini’s art, visit:

http://emmanuelfremingallery.com/project/maurizio-savini/

Creative Thinking Prompt: Napkin Folding Art

Creative Thinking Prompt: Napkin Folding Art

napkinartgriffinjoansallas

What can you create with a napkin? Folding artist Joan Sallas recreates history through his napkin folding art. His sculptures feature griffins, snakes, turkeys, turtles, horses and much more. Each sculpture design is based on his research about the banqueting tables of Renaissance Europe. A true creative, he craves the discovery of creating new folds.

To view Joan Sallas napkin art, watch Joan Sallas: Folded Beauty Masterpieces in Linen at Waddesdon:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PlIS0UMhI6I

So as you set your dinner table, create some art and flair with napkin folding.

To learn more about Joan Sallas and his work, visit:

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/08/12/431271509/unfolding-the-history-of-napkin-art

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/06/joan-sallas-napkin-folder_n_2625924.html