Category Archives: Picture Books

Sweety

“Sweety”

Intro: “Sweety was awkward. Even for a naked mole rat.”

Sweety doesn’t understand what it means to be called Grandma’s little square peg, but she knows that she doesn’t fit in. 

She wonders what it might be like to be someone else. 

Her favorite times are when Aunt Ruth comes to visit. Aunt Ruth says if you stay true to yourself, you’ll find your people.

So Sweety sets out to find her people, trying new things but she remains true to herself until one day something awesome happens.

This book promotes creative components of individuality and traits of a gifted and talented child.

WHY I LIKE THIS BOOK:  I like this book because I feel any reader can relate to that feeling of not fitting in, and find in Sweety’s character, the resilience to remain true to yourself.

TITLE: Sweety

AUTHOR: Andrea Zuill

ILLUSTRATOR: Andrea Zuill

PUBLISHER: Schwartz & Wade, 2019

AGE GROUP: 5-7

TOPIC(S): being yourself, self-esteem, friendship

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: individuality, traits of a gifted and talented child

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) The world would be a boring place if everyone was the same. What three things make you different from others?

2) Try exploring a new hobby.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Andrea Zuill, visit:

“A Story That Grows”

“A Story That Grows”

A Story That Grows is a bedtime story that is sure to engage young readers and prompt imaginations. 

Based on the stuffed animal that the child is holding, readers can guess, before the page is turned, who the next reading family will be.

This book promotes creative components of originality and clever storytelling.

WHY I LIKE THIS BOOK:  I like this book because of its different perspective of telling a bedtime story and that it highlights the caring relationship between a child and caregiver.

TITLE: A Story That Grows

AUTHOR: Gilles Bachelet

ILLUSTRATOR: Gilles Bachelet

PUBLISHER: Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, 2019

Originally published in France, 2016

AGE GROUP: 3-5

TOPIC(S): bedtime, parent-child relationship

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: cleverness, originality, perspective

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Think of three places where you might find groups of animals. (i.e. zoo, carnival) Next pick an animal from your location. Draw your animal father or mother or grandparent telling a bedtime story to an animal child. Don’t forget to add a stuffed animal that the child cuddles.

2) When you hear A Story that Grows, what images came to mind? I first thought of a vegetable that grows on a vine. Then I wondered about how a story could grow. What else could the author mean by the title, A Story that Grows? Use your imagination to write a story that grows using an image that first came to your mind.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Gilles Bachelet, visit:

http://www.seuiljeunesse.com/auteur/gilles-bachelet/273

A Meal of the Stars: Poems Up and Down

“A Meal of the Stars: Poems Up and Down”

In this poetry picture book, poetry is turned on its head. Some poems are meant to be read from the bottom up while others are meant to be read from the top to the bottom. Readers need to figure out whether the poem should be read up or down.

Read up or down?

Read down or up?

Illustrations marry beautifully with the up and down poems to reveal the extraordinary in the ordinary. 

This book promotes creative components of perspective and imagination.

WHY I LIKE THIS BOOK:  I like this book because the poem structure adds depth to the meaning of each poem. I adore the illustrations, which also bring another layer to reading these poems.

TITLE: A Meal of the Stars: Poems Up and Down

AUTHOR: Dana Jensen

ILLUSTRATOR: Tricia Tusa

PUBLISHER: Houghton Mifflin Books for Children, 2012

AGE GROUP: 4-6

TOPIC(S): poetry

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: perspective, imagination

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Think of things that fall or rise up. Pick one of these things and write a “skinny” poem where the reader has to figure out whether to read it up or read it down.

2) Let’s turn things around. Think of things that are long in length. For example, a semi-truck is long.  Write a short poem about your long item by writing it lengthwise – one long line.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Dana Jensen, visit:

A webpage for Dana Jensen could not be located, but here is a little bit about him: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-meal-of-the-stars-dana-jensen/1110914062

To learn more about illustrator Tricia Tusa, visit:

http://www.triciatusa.com/about