Category Archives: Perspective

Sweet Tooth

Sweet Tooth”

Stewart’s sweet tooth screams for cake and candy. It’s constantly getting him in trouble. School detention slip #432. Easter chocolate bunnies never had a chance nor did the wedding cake.

Sweet Tooth yells and demands for more and more sweets. Finally Stewart gets fed up and feeds him peas.

But Sweet Tooth won’t give in. At the biggest baseball game of the season, Stewart is going to win the game for his team but his tooth interferes. Stewart marches home and grabs a carrot.

CRUNCH! Sweet Tooth falls out. He’s the Tooth Fairy’s problem now.

This book promotes imagination, humor and creativity.

TITLE: Sweet Tooth

AUTHOR: Margie Palatini

ILLUSTRATOR: Jack E. Davis

PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster, 2004

AGE GROUP: 6-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: creativity, humor, perspective

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Instead of having a sweet tooth, you have a savory tooth. What might your tooth say? What foods might your tooth crave?

2) Study the shapes of teeth. What types of food does each shape remind you of? Substitute a food for each tooth to make a collage of a mouth full of food teeth.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Margie Palatini, visit:

http://www.margiepalatini.com

To learn more about illustrator Jack E. Davis, visit:

http://www.simonandschuster.com/authors/Jack-E-Davis/1809686

The Gift of Nothing

“The Gift of Nothing”

It is a special day. Mooch wants to give a gift to his best friend, Earl, but what do you give someone who already has a bowl, a bed and a chewy toy? 

 

Nothing.

.

Mooch searches and searches until he finally finds…

 

This sweet book reminds us that the simplest “nothings” are  the best gifts.

This book promotes sharing and different perspective.

TITLE: The Gift of Nothing

AUTHOR: Patrick McDonnell

ILLUSTRATOR: Patrick McDonnell

PUBLISHER: Little Brown Company, 2005

AGE GROUP: 4-7

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: sharing, different perspective

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) How is an empty box be a gift? What would you do if you received an empty box?

2) Love is something that cannot be seen. Or can it? In what ways do you show love?

3) The symbol for love is a heart. What symbol would you create to represent friendship?

4) What does love sound like, smell like, taste like, feel like and look like? Using your answers to these sensory questions, write a poem about love.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Patrick McDonnell, visit:

http://www.mutts.com/about-patrick#

Creative Thinking Prompt: A Stone’s Story

Creative Thinking Prompt: A Stone’s Story

NEW WORLD

Upside-down trees swingin’ free,

Busses float and buildings dangle:

Now and then it’s nice to see

The world from a different angle.

-By Shel Silverstein

This poem had me imaging an upside-down world. I wondered what the trees would be reaching for and what forces kept the heavy busses and building dangle. It’s important to take a step back and look at things from a different perspective, like from the viewpoint of something or someone else and image “what if.”

First, look at the pictures below, what does each stone remind you of?

Second, use your imagination to imagine what special powers each stone has.

Third, pick one of the stones and answer the questions next to its picture.

If you were this stone, how might you see the world? How does it feel to be cut in half? How might that affect how you see the world?

What makes up the inside of this stone? Use this to tell its personal story.

Where might this stone live – another planet, deep in a volcano or ocean, etc.? What might you name this stone and why?

What quest did you as this stone take? Tell about your journey.

THINKING DEEPER: Research a stone of your choice. Use this information to write a creative nonfiction story about your stone.