Category Archives: Taking risks

Crocodali

Crocodali”

Crocodali is the most talented painter in the whole wide world. Readers help him to create a masterpiece by tilting, turning and shaking this book. Oops! Tilted too far. Now what?

Finally, a masterpiece.

Now blow to dry the paint.

Will a masterpiece be created or a mess?

This story promotes imagination, creative expression, and taking risks.

TITLE: Crocodali

AUTHOR: Lucy Volpin

ILLUSTRATOR: Lucy Volpin

PUBLISHER: Little Bee Books, 2017

AGE GROUP: 4-6

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: imagination, creative expression, taking risks

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) On a blank sheet of paper, paint blobs of watercolors, using watercolors. When the paint is dried, use a pen to outline where colors merge. What do shapes or images do your lines form? Use the line to create a picture.

2) Purposely make a mistake on your paper. Don’t erase it. Change your perspective and make your mistake a part of your picture or into something else.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Lucy Volpin, visit:

https://nosycrow.com/contributors/lucy-volpin/

Pocket Full of Colors

 

 

 

 

 

Pocket Full of Colors: The Magical World of Mary Blair, Disney Artist Extraordinaire”

Mary Blair liked to collect colors. After attending art school, she was one of the first women to be hired by Walt Disney Studios. When Mary turned her work in, her ideas were rejected. She didn’t follow the black and white rules. But Walt Disney liked Mary’s art and invited her on a business trip to Brazil.

      In Brazil, Mary discovered vibrant colors.

This time some of Mary’s ideas were accepted but most were still too modern or abstract. Mary decided to leave her job.

Then one day Walt Disney asked Mary to work for him again. Mary did so with a request of her own – to be in charged. Mary designed the colorful ride, It’s A Small World.

This story promotes inventiveness, creativity, following one’s passion, taking risks, and creative person.

TITLE: Pocket Full of Colors: The Magical World of Mary Blair, Disney Artist Extraordinaire

AUTHOR: Amy Guglielmo and Jacqueline Tourville

ILLUSTRATOR: Brigette Barrrager

PUBLISHER: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2017

AGE GROUP: 6-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: inventiveness, creativity, following one’s passion, taking risks, creative person

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Invent your own version of a color wheel, using colors you find that interest you. Instead of using the color itself like a smudge or paint stroke of a color, find images or things that show that color and use these to create your unique color wheel.

2) Start a collection of colors. When you have collected five things that represent a single color or shade of color, assemble those objects together to create a work of art.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about authors Amy Guglielmo and Jacqueline Tourville, visit:

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/98912.Amy_Guglielmo

http://www.simonandschuster.com/authors/Jacqueline-Tourville/548773073

To learn more about illustrator Brigette Barrrager, visit:

http://brigetteb.com

Necks Out For Adventure

Necks Out For Adventure! The True Story of Edwin Wiggleskin”

Edwin, a Wiggleskin, asks his mom a very big question.

“What would happen if we flowed with the current?” The others laugh but his mom says, “Stick your neck out for adventure like you always do.” One day a terrible smell comes with two feet and two hands and scoops up all the Wiggleskins except Edwin.

Edwin gathers his courage and pops from his shell. He rides a big wave until he smells a terrible smell. Edwin rescues the Wiggleskins by teaching them “Necks out” to shuck their shells and run back to the ocean.

This book promotes creativity, courage, and risk-taking.

TITLE: Necks Out For Adventure! The True Story of Edwin Wiggleskin

AUTHOR: Timothy Basil Ering

ILLUSTRATOR: Timothy Basil Ering

PUBLISHER: Candlewick Press, 2008

AGE GROUP: 6-9

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: creativity, courage, risk-taking

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Author Timothy Basil Ering doesn’t call a clam a clam. Instead he creates a new name, “wiggleskins.” Make a list of animals you’d find at the ocean. Next to each animal write another name for it. As you think up these new names, consider the animal’s attributes, habits and appearance.

2) What makes up an adventure? In your words, define the word adventure. What types of adventures interest you? Describe an adventure you’d like to take.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Timothy Basil Ering, visit:

http://www.encyclopedia.com/children/scholarly-magazines/ering-timothy-basil