Category Archives: wordless

Once Upon A Banana

Once Upon A Banana”

Rhyming street signs pair with fun illustrations to tell a rollicking trouble-causing adventure in this wordless picture book, Once Upon A Banana. The catastrophe starts when a runaway monkey escapes from his trainer. The monkey throws his banana peel on the sidewalk instead of placing it in the trash as the sign states.

Someone slips on the peel, knocks over a ladder, causing the painter to fall into a cart, which leads to…

and leads to…

and leads to……

This book promotes creativeness, cause and effect relationships and imagination.

TITLE: Once Upon A Banana

AUTHOR: Jennifer Armstrong

ILLUSTRATOR: David Small

PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2006

AGE GROUP: 4-6

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: creative, imaginative, cause and effect relationships

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Make a list of all the signs you see around town. Invent two signs of your own. Make them rhyme with each other.

2) Like the problem in the book, someone slipping on a banana peel causing an entire town to turn upside-down, use the idiom “it’s raining cats and dogs” as the problem in your story. Imagine what might happen and then write a story.

 EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Jennifer Armstrong, visit:

http://www.simonandschuster.com/authors/Jennifer-Armstrong/20411275

To learn more about illustrator David Small, visit:

http://www.davidsmallbooks.com

“Number Counting in the City”

“Number Counting in the City”

citybynumbers

City by Numbers

Author Stephen T. Johnson challenges readers to look beyond initial appearances to discover numbers 1 through 21 in New York City.  Within Johnson’s cityscape paintings, the curves and lines of numbers are hidden. This wordless picture book promotes imagination, discovery, creativity, flexible thinking, perspective, and wonder.

citybynumberspage

Can you find numbers 8 and 9?

TITLE: City by Numbers

AUTHOR: Stephen T. Johnson

ILLUSTRATOR: Stephen T. Johnson

PUBLISHER: Viking, 1998

AGE GROUP: 4-7

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: imagination, discovery, creativity, flexible thinking, perspective, and wonder

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Take a walk around your school or neighborhood. Search for numbers. Sketch one of the numbers you discovered. Did others find numbers in different places than you? Using the students’ sketches, make a class book.

2) Pick a number. Camouflage your number inside a picture that you draw. See if others can find your number.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Stephen T. Johnson’s books, visit:

http://www.stephentjohnson.com

Don’t Just Look, Read Those Pictures

Creative Thinking Prompt: Don’t Just Look, Read Those Pictures

heartOur minds can quickly assign meaning to images. A stop sign means stop. A heart means love. The letters of the alphabet are lines and curves assembled in specific patterns to create meaning. Even math uses symbols such as  ∞ , >,  ≠  to denote meaning.

When additional images are added to a single image, what happens? A picture.

Brainstorm what the purpose of a picture is.

When you brainstorm, write down all your ideas as they come to you. Do not analyze them. This is not the time for that because you want to think up the most original, creative idea you can. The more ideas you have, the more unusual your ideas become. Eventually, you run out of ideas. Don’t stop. Push yourself to think of at least five more ideas because at this point unique ideas originate.

How can a picture tell a story? Look at a wordless picture book.

What elements does a picture need in order to tell a story? Here are some to get started.

-Background: color use, frame or no frame, place, time

-Perspective: point of view of the character, is the character at the forefront or the back of the

-Personality: clothing, facial expression (eyes, tilt of head, mouth, ears), what is the character doing, age

What are some other elements that help tell the story of a picture?