Tag Archives: Barney Saltzberg

Creative Thinking Prompt: Celebrate Oops!

Celebrating Celebrate Oops!

celebrateoops

Creative Thinking Prompt: Celebrate Oops!

Today we celebrate the one year anniversary of author Barney Saltzberg’s and Workman Publishing’s creativity program Celebrate Oops!  Launched last year on January 15, 2015,  Celebrate Oops! is an initiative designed to teach acceptance of mistakes and foster creativity, based on Saltzberg’s picture book Beautiful Oops!. 

A mistake is a chance to make something beautiful. Celebrate Oops! offers a free downloadable Educators Guide. Please visit http://beautifuloops.com to see how your classroom or you can participate.

“Beautiful Oops!”

“Beautiful Oops!”

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Beautiful Oops!

Beautiful Oops! is a timeless lesson about turning mistakes into beautiful works of art.

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“Mistakes” are all in how you look at them.

I truly appreciate author Barney Saltzberg bringing this lesson to children as well as to the adults who read this book. We all need to understand and give ourselves permission to make mistakes, which are really not mistakes at all but opportunities to learn. Giving one’s self permission to make mistakes and to take risks are two of the many traits of a creative person.

TITLE: Beautiful Oops!

AUTHOR: Barney Saltzberg

ILLUSTRATOR: Barney Saltzberg

PUBLISHER: Workman Publishing, 2010

AGE GROUP: 3-7

CREATIVE COMPONENTS:  imagination, creative expression, risk-taking, permission to be creative, new perspectives

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) As an artist Leonardo da Vinci saw images in nature and everyday objects such as cracks in a wall or clouds that he’d sketch. Choose a spot on a wall or cracks in the sidewalk. Stare at that spot until an image develops in your mind. Sketch your image. Now look at that same spot on the wall or the sidewalk. Do you see your sketched image or an entirely different image?

2) Create a paint blot. Place a large blob of paint in the middle of a blank sheet of paper. Fold the paper in half. Gently, smush the paint by pressing down with the palm of your hand. Unfold the paper. What does the paint blot look like? Ask those around you what it looks like to them. How many different answers did you get? Now try this. Fold a paper in half. Unfold the paper. Along the folded line, place small dots of paint. Refold the paper. Unfold. What do you see? What else can it be? Once the paint has dried develop this paint blot into one of the images you imagined it could be.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Barney Saltzberg,

visit: http://www.barneysaltzberg.com

“What A Line Can Become”

“What A Line Can Become”

andrewdrewanddrew

Andrew Drew and Drew

Andrew was a doodle boy. As readers follow Andrew’s doodle line by lifting page flaps, they discover how Andrew’s imagination transforms a line into a doodle.

andrewstarteddrawingpage  andrewdrewpage2  andrewdrewpage3

Andrew Drew and Drew celebrates the discovery of imagination, allowing the process of creativity to unfold.

This book promotes creativity, imagination, discovery and the creative process.

TITLE: Andrew Drew and Drew

AUTHOR: Barney Saltzberg

ILLUSTRATOR: Barney Saltzberg

PUBLISHER: Abrams Appleseed, 2012

AGE GROUP: 4-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: creativity, imagination, discovery, creative process

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Make your mind a blank slate. Don’t think about anything. When your mind is clear, pick up a pencil and begin to move your hand in any direction on a blank piece of paper for one minute. Then from your line doodle, pick a section of your line. On a clean sheet of paper, using your chosen line segment, start a new doodle. Spend only a minute or two on your doodle, transforming this doodle into a picture.

Here is my doodle line (the curly one) that I made into a picture.

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A bird air surfing through the spray of rollicking ocean waves.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Barney Saltzberg,

visit: http://www.barneysaltzberg.com

Be A Star!

Be A Star!

staroftheweek

Finally, it’s Stanley’s turn to be Star of the Week. Each day Stanley shares one favorite thing about himself, but Stanley’s classmates laugh at him. Stanley no longer wants to share. His teacher encourages him to finish what he started. Nervous about sharing his most treasured thing to do – his passion for drawing, Stanley draws a squiggly line. His classmates laugh again, but quickly change their minds when Stanley meets their challenge to create pictures from lines that they have drawn.

Star of the Week written and illustrated by Barney Saltzberg shows readers what it means to take a risk, acceptance of one’s self and to celebrate uniqueness.

TITLE: Star of the Week

AUTHOR: Barney Saltzberg

ILLUSTRATOR: Barney Saltzberg

PUBLISHER: Candlewick Press, 2006

AGE GROUP: elementary

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: uniqueness, imagination, passion, acceptance of one’s self

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Working with a partner, each person draws a squiggly line on separate sheets of paper. Taking your partner’s drawing, pretend you are the squiggle line and act it out.

2) Students draw a squiggly line on a small piece of paper. Tape one drawing onto the center of a large piece of paper or poster board. Take the remaining drawings and add them, connecting each line to the next line. Once all lines have been connected, take a moment to look at the image as a whole. What do you see? What do the lines form?

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Barney Saltzberg, visit: http://www.barneysaltzberg.com