Tag Archives: brainstorming

Creative Thinking Prompt: Is This A Dog?

Creative Thinking Prompt: Is This A Dog?

Is this a dog? No.

Is this a pepperoni pizza? No.

Is this a crab? No.

Take another look or in this case take a taste. All these images are cakes created by cake artist Debbie Goard whose sculpted cakes are so realistic they don’t look like they could be eaten. Some of her clients include Pixar, Goggle, Playstation, and Muscle Milk.

Cake Artist Debbie Goard

Creative Thinking Prompt: Similar to Debbie Goard, what type of material could you use to create something that disguises the material and leads your audience to believe that your product is something that it is not? Brainstorm a list of materials. For each material, brainstorm what product could be created using that material.

Extended Connections:

To learn more about Debbie Goard, visit:

https://www.debbiedoescakes.net/the-artist

Creative Thinking Prompt: An Egg of Ideas

Creative Thinking Prompt: An Egg of Ideas

◊  Go on an egg hunt for ideas. Make a list of subjects. Write each subject on a small piece of paper. Fill the plastic eggs with the papers. Hide the eggs. After the egg hunt, students make a list of “I wonder” questions that interest them about the subject in each egg. Use the 5W1H creative thinking technique – who, what, when, where, why and how.

◊  What else can an egg be? Brainstorm for at least ten minutes. Circle the most unusual idea.

◊  In what ways might an egg be used? Brainstorm for at least ten minutes.

◊  Decorate an egg in a way that disguises the egg.

◊  Write a short story about an adventure that an egg might have from the viewpoint of the egg.

◊  Invent a game using plastic eggs.

These activities encourage curiosity, flexible thinking, perspective, and imagination.

Creative Thinking Prompt: Building with Ice Cubes

Ice is slippery. Ice is wet. Ice melts. Then how can you build with ice?

Creative Thinking Prompt: Build a structure using ice cubes, using the creative thinking strategy SCAMPER. SCAMPER was developed by Bob Eberle based upon Alex Osborn’s creating thinking questions. Alex Osborn is the originator of brainstorming.

SCAMPER

Scamper is based upon seven creative thinking principles. Each principle views your idea in a different manner. By asking questions related to each principle, Scamper gets you thinking about which areas of your idea you can improve.

S = Substitute:  Remove some part and replace it with something else.

What else can I use instead of clear water to create ice cubes?

C = Combination:  Join or force together two or more elements of your subject to develop a solution.

What things can I combine together to make a better ice cube?

What can I use to stick the cubes together?

A = Adapt:  Change some part so that it works where before it didn’t work.

What might I do to change the structure of the ice cubes to make them not melt quickly?

M = Magnify or modify:  Consider the attributes of the subject and change them. Attributes include: size, shape, other dimensions, texture, color, position, etc.

How will smaller or larger ice cubes work within my structure?

P = Put to other uses:  Think about your subject – why it exists, what it is used for, what it’s supposed to do. Then think up new and unusual purposes.           

How else can I use an ice cube?

E = Eliminate:  Remove any or all elements of the subject.

What can I remove from my structure to make it stronger and last longer?

R = Rearrange or reverse:  Look at the subject from different perspectives. Turn it upside-down, inside-out. Make it go backwards, against the direction it was intended to go or be used. Similar to Reverse, modify the order of operations or any other hierarchy involved.

What would happen if I rearrange the ice cubes in my structure?

As I used SCAMPER more questions popped into my mind.

  • How would using pop, sugar water, jello, or millk affect the structure of an ice cube?
  • Would the different ingredients make the cube stick together easier? Would it melt less?
  • What if I let the cubes melt a little and then refreeze them – would my structure “stick” together?
  • How would small and large cubes help with building my structure?
  • Is there a better way to build an ice structure?
  • What if I froze a smaller cube inside a larger cube?
  • How can I make my structure colorful?

To make glow-in-the-dark cubes, visit: http://www.learnplayimagine.com/2012/02/glow-in-dark-water-beads.html

Think Deeper: Build an ice cube arch.