Tag Archives: combining

Stardines

Stardines: Swim High Across The Sky And Other Poems”

PoetJack Prelutsky combines his love of words and his creativity to produce a new collection of never before seen specimens. Come meet the Bluffaloes, the Swapitis, the Fountain Lions, the Slobsters and twelve other new creatures.

“The Stardines”

“The Plandas”

This book promotes creativity, combination, originality, and imagination.

TITLE: Stardines: Swim High Across The Sky And Other Poems

AUTHOR: Jack Prelutsky

ILLUSTRATOR: Carin Berger

PUBLISHER: Greenwillow Books, 2012

AGE GROUP: 6-9

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: creativity, combination, originality, imagination

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Open a dictionary to a random page. Close your eyes and place your finger somewhere on the page. Write down the word and its definition closest to your finger. Repeat this process. Re-read the definitions of your two words. What images come to mind? How might you pair these together? Invent a new species from combining your two words. Give your species a name. Write a poem describing your creature.

2) Create a class book of these new species. OR Have students develop their species into 3D specimens that can be displayed as a classroom exhibit.

 EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Jack Prelutsky, visit:

http://jackprelutsky.com

To learn more about illustrator Carin Berger, visit:

http://www.carinberger.com

I’m Trying To Love Spiders

imtryingtolovespiderscover

A creative non-fiction book, I’m Trying To Love Spiders, combines facts about spiders and author Bethany Barton’s journey of overcoming her fear of spiders.

imtryingtolovespiderspg1 ©Bethany Barton

In regards to her perspective on spiders, Bethany Barton stated, “I want to think of them as bug ninjas.” She believes that she shouldn’t be afraid of them since spiders do good things for the world. Did you know that a single spider can eat over 75 pounds of bugs in a year?

imstilltyringtolovespiderspg2 ©Bethany Barton

Humorous illustrations accompany spider facts.

This story promotes humor, combination – facts with imagination, and a different perspective.

TITLE: I’m Trying To Love Spiders

AUTHOR: Bethany Barton

ILLUSTRATOR: Bethany Barton

PUBLISHER: Viking, 2015

AGE GROUP: 4-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: humor, combination – facts with imagination, and different perspective

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Pick an animal that you don’t like. Research that animal. Discover at least five facts that you find good (positive) about it. Having learned these new facts, how does it change your perception about the animal? Remember even if you still don’t like the animal, you can appreciate and respect it.

2) Make a variety of homemade spiders.

spider-handprint Handprint spider.

Egg carton with pipe cleaner spider. egg-carton-spider

donut-pretzel-spiders-halloween-easy-fun-kid-craft Doughnut and pretzel spider. To easily make these, visit: http://www.itsalwaysautumn.com/2014/09/24/easy-mini-donut-spiders-easy-halloween-treat-kids-can-make.html#_a5y_p=2500159

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Bethany Barton, visit:

http://www.bethanybarton.com

Making Origami Science Experiments

origamiscience

Use origami (paper folding) to perform scientific experiments and test hypotheses. From a dish soap racing boat to a table kite to a fan, readers practice origami folds to test science concepts such as surface tension, water molecules, air resistance, gravity and mass.

origamisciencepage

This story promotes creative problem solving, wonder, discovery and combination.

TITLE: Making Origami Science Experiments Step by Step

AUTHOR: Michael G. LaFosse

ILLUSTRATOR: Michael G. LaFosse

PUBLISHER: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc., 2004

AGE GROUP: 6-9

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: creative problem solving, wonder, discovery, combination.

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) A hypothesis is a guess. Develop a hypothesis that you’d like to test. Then design an experiment to prove or disprove your hypothesis. After you’ve completed your experiment, what new questions do you have? Will you create a new hypothesis?

2) Fold a piece of paper. Smaller and smaller… How many times can you fold the paper? Could this folding go on indefinitely or will it stop?

3) To create origami art, visit this link: http://www.origami-instructions.com

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Michael G. LaFosse, visit: http://www.origamido.com