Tag Archives: creative process

Niko Draws A Feeling

“Niko Draws A Feeling

Everywhere that Niko looks, he draws something that inspires him like the ring-a-ling of an ice cream truck and the hard work of a mother robin building her nest.

No one understands his drawings until one day a girl moves in next door and sees sadness in his drawing.

Niko draws her a picture and asks her, “What is this?” She answers, “It makes me feel like I made a new friend.”

This book promotes imagination, a different perspective, and being unique.

TITLE: Niko Draws A Feeling

AUTHOR: Bob Raczka

ILLUSTRATOR: Simone Shin

PUBLISHER: Carolrhoda, 2017

AGE GROUP: 4-7

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: imagination, a different perspective, unique

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Pick an emotion. Draw what that emotion feels like to you. Draw the opposite emotion of the emotion you picked.

2) Draw the surprise of a surprise party. Draw the joy of receiving a present.

3) Abstract Art is expression of emotion that uses only lines, colors, and shapes, no subject.

Make your own abstract art. Think of an emotion. Freely draw lines onto a blank sheet of paper. Fill in your picture with different colors.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about Bob Raczka, visit:

http://www.bobraczka.com/about/

To learn more about Simone Shin, visit:

http://simoneshin.com

Creative Thinking Prompt: Design A Toy

 

 
Creative Thinking Prompt: Design A Toy

  Step One: Research past and present toys.

Which ones do you like? Why?

Which ones do you not like? Why?

Which characteristics of the toys you picked could you use in your new toy?

What parts from your favorite toy could you use in your new toy?

Now ⇒  Think About Your Toy Design

Color?

Shape?

Size?

Moving Parts?

Feel?

Sound?

What type of toy do you want to make?

What materials will your toy be made from?

What can you do with it?

Why is it fun to play with?

Who will play with this toy?

Who will buy this toy?

How will someone play with it?

 Step Two: Sketch out your design.

 Step Three: Invent your toy.

Use recyclables and items found around the house to design your toy.

Introduce your toy to someone. Let them ask questions about your toy.

 Step Four: Revise your toy design.

  Step Five: Name your toy. Write a brief description on how to play with your toy.

 Step Six: Marketing

Where will you sell your toy?

Design a logo and brand name.

How will you package your toy?

What will your toy cost?

How is your toy different than other toys?

Why would someone buy your toy?

  Happy Toy Inventing!  

The Big Adventure Of A Little Line

The Big Adventure Of A Little Line”

While walking a boy finds a line by the side of the road. He brings it home and forgets about it. Then one day he puts the line on a blank page. It moves. So everyday he opens his notebook and talks to the line.

Sometimes the line wouldn’t do what the boy wanted.

The boy and his line grow up together. Inseparable, they tell stories, visit famous people, do dangerous things and travel the world.

Then the time comes. The boy, who is now a man, cuts off a tiny piece of the line and places it along the road. Who will pick it up?

This book promotes creative process, creative expression, and passion.

TITLE: The Big Adventure Of A Little Line

AUTHOR: Serge Bloch

ILLUSTRATOR: Serge Bloch

PUBLISHER: Thames & Hudson, 2015

AGE GROUP: 4-7

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: creative process, creative expression, passion

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) What artist do you admire? What do you admire about that artist? How is that artist creative? In what ways are you like that artist? If you think you aren’t similar to your chosen artist, think deeper because you do have something in common.

2) How is a line like a star? How is an artist like a brain? How is a book without pictures like you? After you answer these questions, develop your own questions comparing lines to other things that seem as if they wouldn’t have anything in common.

3) Listening to music of your choice, draw one continuous line for one minute (no lifting your pencil). Then reflect on your line. Turn it sideways, upside-down to see what else it can be. Transform your line into an image or incorporate it into another picture you have already drawn.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Serge Bloch, visit:

http://www.sergebloch.com