Tag Archives: creative thinking

Tomorrow’s Alphabet

Tomorrow’s Alphabet”

In Tomorrow’s Alphabet, you’ll have to think ahead. Not your ordinary alphabet storybook, author George Shannon takes a different perspective, taking what happens today and showing what it becomes tomorrow.

   

M is for caterpillar – tomorrow’s MOTH.”

  

O is for acorn – tomorrow’s OAK TREE

In the back of the book, readers are challenged to create their own tomorrow alphabet. Or try their hand at creating yesterday’s alphabet.

This book promotes discovery, different perspective, and inventive thinking.

TITLE: Tomorrow’s Alphabet

AUTHOR: George Shannon

ILLUSTRATOR: Donald Crews

PUBLISHER: Greenwillow Books, 1996

AGE GROUP: 4-7

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: discovery, different perspective, inventive thinking

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Make an ABC list of your favorite sounding words. Your words can begin or end with each letter of the alphabet.

For example, A – apricot B – bumble C – cubic

2) Sing the ABC song in reverse, beginning with Z.

3) Write an ABC poem of your favorite things, using each letter to start the next line of your poem.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author George Shannon, visit:

http://www.georgeshannonauthor.com

To learn more about illustrator Donald Crews, visit:

http://www.kidsreads.com/authors/donald-crews

Creative Thinking Prompt: Building with Ice Cubes

Ice is slippery. Ice is wet. Ice melts. Then how can you build with ice?

Creative Thinking Prompt: Build a structure using ice cubes, using the creative thinking strategy SCAMPER. SCAMPER was developed by Bob Eberle based upon Alex Osborn’s creating thinking questions. Alex Osborn is the originator of brainstorming.

SCAMPER

Scamper is based upon seven creative thinking principles. Each principle views your idea in a different manner. By asking questions related to each principle, Scamper gets you thinking about which areas of your idea you can improve.

S = Substitute:  Remove some part and replace it with something else.

What else can I use instead of clear water to create ice cubes?

C = Combination:  Join or force together two or more elements of your subject to develop a solution.

What things can I combine together to make a better ice cube?

What can I use to stick the cubes together?

A = Adapt:  Change some part so that it works where before it didn’t work.

What might I do to change the structure of the ice cubes to make them not melt quickly?

M = Magnify or modify:  Consider the attributes of the subject and change them. Attributes include: size, shape, other dimensions, texture, color, position, etc.

How will smaller or larger ice cubes work within my structure?

P = Put to other uses:  Think about your subject – why it exists, what it is used for, what it’s supposed to do. Then think up new and unusual purposes.           

How else can I use an ice cube?

E = Eliminate:  Remove any or all elements of the subject.

What can I remove from my structure to make it stronger and last longer?

R = Rearrange or reverse:  Look at the subject from different perspectives. Turn it upside-down, inside-out. Make it go backwards, against the direction it was intended to go or be used. Similar to Reverse, modify the order of operations or any other hierarchy involved.

What would happen if I rearrange the ice cubes in my structure?

As I used SCAMPER more questions popped into my mind.

  • How would using pop, sugar water, jello, or millk affect the structure of an ice cube?
  • Would the different ingredients make the cube stick together easier? Would it melt less?
  • What if I let the cubes melt a little and then refreeze them – would my structure “stick” together?
  • How would small and large cubes help with building my structure?
  • Is there a better way to build an ice structure?
  • What if I froze a smaller cube inside a larger cube?
  • How can I make my structure colorful?

To make glow-in-the-dark cubes, visit: http://www.learnplayimagine.com/2012/02/glow-in-dark-water-beads.html

Think Deeper: Build an ice cube arch.

The Most Magnificent Thing

“The Most Magnificent Thing

One day a girl has a wonderful idea to make the most magnificent thing. She knows how it will look and how it will work. After she makes it, it doesn’t look or work how she imagined.

She tries again and again but it still won’t work. It isn’t magnificent.

Frustrated and angry, she quits. Her trusty helper tells her to go for a walk.

When they return, she sees all the things she created. Each one better than before. That gives her an idea…

This book promotes discovery, the creative process, and risk-taking.

TITLE: The Most Magnificent Thing

AUTHOR: Ashley Spires

ILLUSTRATOR: Ashley Spires

PUBLISHER: Kids Can Press, 2014

AGE GROUP: 6-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: discovery, the creative process, risk-taking

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Pick an invention that interests you. What might you change to make it better? What might you add or subtract from it? Can you substitute a different part? What else can the invention be used for?

2) What do you do when you are frustrated? Do you quit, give up? Do you push forward and try again? Do you try a new approach? Tell about a time that you wanted to quit but you didn’t.

 EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Ashley Spires, visit:

https://www.ashleyspires.com/index.html