Tag Archives: diversity

The Patchwork Bike

The Patchwork Bike” 

In the book, The Patchwork Bike, siblings make their own fun by building a bike from scratch.

Using a hodgepodge of scavenged items, they assemble their bike and ride it through their village and their mud-for-walls home.

Lyrical language and powerful illustrations create an evocative story.

This story promotes creative components of diversity, resourceful, imagination, and inventiveness.

WHY I LIKE THIS BOOK: I like this book because the marriage of text and perfectly evoke the joy of riding a bike and capturing readers’ imagination. The title immediately piqued my curiosity, and I wondered how could a bike be patchwork. I enjoyed the author’s lyrical language such as shicketty shake and winketty wonk.

TITLE: The Patchwork Bike

AUTHOR: Maxine Beneba Clarke

ILLUSTRATOR: Van Thanh Rudd

PUBLISHER: Candlewick Press, 2018

AGE GROUP: 3-6

TOPIC(S): recycled materials, culture, siblings, bike riding

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: diversity, resourceful, imagination, inventiveness

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Hodgepodge, a synonym for patchwork, is defined as being composed of parts of different kinds. Basically, it is an assortment of different things that do not originally go together but are assembled together to create a final product. What can you make? Gather different items. Take apart the larger items (with permission) into smaller parts. Looking at these various parts, what can you make to create a hodgepodge machine? What is the function(s) of your machine? Build your machine. Name your machine.

2) Design a bike that reflects your personality. Conduct research on different types of bicycles. Remember to look at past bikes, recent bikes, and even bikes of the future to inspire your design.

3) Illustrator Van Thanh Rudd painted on recycled cardboard for the book’s illustrations. Try your hand at painting on cardboard. How is it different from painting on paper? Why do you think the illustrator used cardboard?

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Maxine Beneba Clarke, visit:

https://www.hachette.com.au/maxine-beneba-clarke/

To learn more about illustrator Van Thanh Rudd, visit:

https://www.van-t-rudd.net/illustration.html

A New School Year: Stories in Six Voices

A New School Year: Stories in Six Voices”

Told in free verse poems written by Sally Derby, A New School Year: Stories in Six Voices,features six students from different backgrounds, kindergarten through fifth grade, as they prepare and attend their first day of school.

This book promotes diversity and different perspectives.

TITLE: A New School Year: Stories in Six Voices

AUTHOR: Sally Derby

ILLUSTRATOR: Mika Song

PUBLISHER: Charlesbridge, 2017

AGE GROUP: 6-9

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: different perspectives, diversity

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Write a poem or story about your first day of school. Remember to use your five senses.

2) Pretend you are a new student at a new school. How might you want others to treat you? What can you do to welcome new students at your school this year? 

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Sally Derby, visit:

https://www.amazon.com/Sally-Derby/e/B001HMLNS8

To learn more about illustrator Mika Song, visit:

www.mikasongdraws.com

To learn more about the book, visit:

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/548788/a-new-school-year-by-sally-derby-author-mika-song-illustrator/9781580897303/

 

Home

Home

Home”

Animals, people, storybook characters live in many different structures called homes. Carson Ellis introduces readers to a variety of homes found throughout time and the world.

homepage1

Illustrations tickle readers’ imaginations as they wonder about who lives in these homes.

homepage2

This story promotes flexible thinking, making connections, and diversity.

TITLE: Home

AUTHOR: Carson Ellis

ILLUSTRATOR: Carson Ellis

PUBLISHER: Candlewick Press, 2015

AGE GROUP: 4-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: flexible thinking, making connections, and diversity

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Think about the neighborhood you live in. List 10 different homes. Think about a place you visited. List 10 different homes. Compare the homes on your lists. How are they alike? How are they different? Which home would you only like to visit and why? Which home would you like to live in and why?

2) Home and house can mean different things to different people. What does each mean to you? What does qualities does a home have that a house doesn’t?

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/ illustrator Carson Ellis, visit:

http://www.carsonellis.com