Tag Archives: inventive

Flight School

Flight School”

Little Penguin has the heart of an eagle but he isn’t made to soar. He goes to Flight School to learn how to fly.

“Penguins just aren’t build to fly,” said Teacher.

Sad Little Penguin readies to leave school but his friends have an idea.

With some technical help, Little Penguin flies.

This book promotes individuality and passion for one’s dream.

TITLE: Flight School

AUTHOR: Lita Judge

ILLUSTRATOR: Lita Judge

PUBLISHER: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2014

AGE GROUP: 4-7

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: individuality, perseverance, passion for one’s dream

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) The old saying goes “Birds of a feather stick together.” But Little Penguin didn’t stay with his flock. He decided to pursue his dream. What’s something you aren’t old enough to do (that is safe) that you really, really want to do? How might you persuade a grown-up that you are ready?

2) Using colored craft feathers, make a rainbow creation to remind yourself to pursue your dreams no matter how challenging.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Lita Judge, visit:

http://www.litajudge.net

Creative Thinking Prompt: Snow Words

Creative Thinking Prompt: Create Your Own Snow Words

Many countries have different words for different types of snow. To date the Sami culture  of Finland, Norway, Sweden and Russia, are known to have 180 words to describe snow while the Scottish have over 413 words for snow.

http://www.k-international.com/blog/which-language-has-the-most-words-for-snow/

Skelf – snowflake (Scotland)

Snjór/Snær: Snow (Icelandic)

Ciegar: Snowfield which has been trampled and dug up by reindeer (Sami)

Lappvante- thick falling snow (Swedish)

Aputi: snow on the ground (Inuit/Yupik)

Creative Thinking Prompt: Create Your Own Snow Words

  1. Brainstorm different types of snow. Spark your imagination by looking at how other countries and cultures view snow.
  2. Invent 10 new words to describe different types of snow. Notice how your words sound and look. What if you used marks above vowels, how would that change the sound of your words?
  3. How would people unfamiliar with your language learn your new language?

For extra fun, experiment by making snow playdough using two ingredients.

SNOW DOUGH RECIPE 1

Equal amounts of each:

Cornstarch

Unscented Lotion

Optional:

Glitter and/or a drop of Peppermint Extract or Oil

SNOW PLAY DOUGH RECIPE 2 using baking soda and hair conditioner:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZbjrYcNpPs

Creative Thinking Prompt: Design A Chair That’s You

Creative Thinking Prompt: Design A Chair That’s You

A chair is a commonly used object. Here are some truly unique ones.

 rhino, walrus, octopus

 books and CDs

Creative Thinking Prompt: Design a chair that represents you. Use your imagination to create a chair that doesn’t resemble a traditional chair. Make it as original as you. What are some different types of chairs (rocking chair, throne, etc.)? What materials would you use and why? What is the purpose of your chair? What colors will you use? How will you decorate/embellish your chair? How will you use your chair? How many legs will your chair have? Will your chair have a back? What will the back look like? How will the seat of your chair be designed? Sketch your chair design.

To view some more interesting chairs, visit:

http://www.digsdigs.com/50-awesome-creative-chair-designs/

https://www.designswan.com/archives/10-ultra-cool-chairs-design.html

Creative Thinking Prompt: Sand Castles

Creative Thinking Prompt: Sand Castles

Whether you go to the beach or play in the sand at your local park, get ready to be inspired by these sand castles.

      

http://www.mostbeautifulthings.net/best-sand-castles/

 Image: thecreatorsproject.vice.com

 Image: www.babble.com

http://list25.com/25-of-the-most-amazing-sand-castles-ever-built/5/

Creative Thinking Prompt: Design a sand castle that serves a purpose. Who would live in your sand castle? How is your castle protected? What rooms does your castle need? Where would your castle be built? Why is your castle being built? How will your castle stay intact? Give your castle a name. Sketch your castle. Then build it!

Mr. Putney’s Quacking Dog

“Mr. Putney’s Quacking Dog

In the picture book, Mr. Putney’s Quacking Dog, Mr. Putney has all sorts of unusual friends. Readers guess the animals’ names based on clues in the pictures and text.

Turn the page to discover Mr. Putney’s animal friend.

Turn the page to discover Mr. Putney’s animal friend.

This book promotes creativity, inventiveness and imagination.

TITLE: Mr. Putney’s Quacking Dog

AUTHOR: Jon Agee

ILLUSTRATOR: Jon Agee

PUBLISHER: Michael Di Capua Books, Scholastic, 2010

AGE GROUP: 6-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: creativity, inventiveness, imagination

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Invent your own animal riddles like author Jon Agee.

Other animal riddles from the story are

pastry + turtle = tartle and chicken pox + hippo = hippospotamus.

2) Write riddle poetry. Visit:

http://www.poetry4kids.com/news/writing-riddles/

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator Jon Agee, visit:

http://www.jonagee.com

DIZZY

Dizzy

Dizzy, a picture book biography, “is the story of one real cool cat who must have been born with a horn in his hands…” Dizzy Gillespie, born poor and often beat up by other kids, re-channeled his anger into playing the trumpet given to him by his music teacher. As he grew older, Dizzy refused to follow the rules of music. He clowned around, added notes to songs, played never-been-heard notes, and always puffed out his cheeks when playing his trumpet. Dizzy had created a new kind of music – BEBOP.

This story is written like a jazz song with LOUD and s t a c c a t o beats, short lines, long lines and more, so the reader can feel the rhythm as seen in the illustration below.

This book promotes individuality, inventor, creative person, risk-taker, unique, and following one’s heart.

TITLE: Dizzy

AUTHOR: Jonah Winter

ILLUSTRATOR: Sean Qualls

PUBLISHER: Arthur A. Levine Books, 2006

AGE GROUP: 6-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: individuality, inventor, creative person, risk-taker, unique, following one’s heart

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) What are you passionate about? Do you feel like you can’t live without it? If you couldn’t pursue your passion, what would you do instead?

2) How do you express yourself creatively?

3) Whether or not you play instrument, what instrument do you like the sound of the most? What instrument do you like the structure and shape of the most?

4)

Notice how the illustrator uses color and thick brush strokes to convey the energy and tone of Dizzy’s music. Paint how you feel when you are doing something you love and then paint how you feel when you are doing something you don’t like.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Jonah Winter, visit:

http://www.jonahwinter.com

To learn more about illustrator Sean Qualls, visit:

http://seanqualls.com

Creative Thinking Prompt: Play ZA ZA ZOOM! ®

Use your imagination to play ZA ZA ZOOM! ®  created by Hervé Tullet, the author/illustrator of these books

Press Here,

Let’s Play!,

and Mix It Up!

ZA ZA ZOOM! ® an open-ended game with its double-sided cards

fosters imagination and stimulates creative thinking. There are many different ways to play. Players can create their own games, play a matching game or the Roadbuilder game or the Patterngrower game.

Ages: 3 and up

Players: 2-4 players; partners or single players

Created by: Hervé Tullet (picture book author/illustrator)

Published: Chronicle Books, 2016

Any way you play it, ZA ZA ZOOM! ® is sure to be a visual adventure.

To learn more about Hervé Tullet, visit:

http://www.herve-tullet.com

Creative Thinking Prompt: Unusual Knitting

Creative Thinking Prompt: Unusual Knitting

Knitting Artist Dave Cole

knits using unusual materials such as lead-lined fabric and Kevlar and using unusual knitting needles like excavation machines and rifles.

This teddy bear he knitted from fiberglass.

@ http://flavorwire.com/140464/10-artists-who-use-yarn-as-their-medium/5

This flag he knitted using John Deere excavation machines.

Titled “The Knitting Machine.”

@ http://davecoledavecole.com/#/the-knitting-machine/

 Creative Thinking Prompt: Brainstorm a list of knitting materials that someone can use to knit with. Brainstorm a second list of items that can be used as knitting needles. Pair one of your knitting materials with one of your knitting needles items, then Google to see if anyone has ever tried knitting in that fashion.

EXTENDED LEARNING CONNECTIONS:

To view more of Dave Cole art, visit:

https://spinhandspun.wordpress.com/2009/05/14/dave-cole/

Kids can knit with their fingers. Watch this easy tutorial to start creating your own knitting handiworks.

‪How to Finger Knit, Episode 80 by Fiber Flux at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MsZsUBYU0qU

Tomorrow’s Alphabet

Tomorrow’s Alphabet”

In Tomorrow’s Alphabet, you’ll have to think ahead. Not your ordinary alphabet storybook, author George Shannon takes a different perspective, taking what happens today and showing what it becomes tomorrow.

   

M is for caterpillar – tomorrow’s MOTH.”

  

O is for acorn – tomorrow’s OAK TREE

In the back of the book, readers are challenged to create their own tomorrow alphabet. Or try their hand at creating yesterday’s alphabet.

This book promotes discovery, different perspective, and inventive thinking.

TITLE: Tomorrow’s Alphabet

AUTHOR: George Shannon

ILLUSTRATOR: Donald Crews

PUBLISHER: Greenwillow Books, 1996

AGE GROUP: 4-7

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: discovery, different perspective, inventive thinking

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Make an ABC list of your favorite sounding words. Your words can begin or end with each letter of the alphabet.

For example, A – apricot B – bumble C – cubic

2) Sing the ABC song in reverse, beginning with Z.

3) Write an ABC poem of your favorite things, using each letter to start the next line of your poem.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author George Shannon, visit:

http://www.georgeshannonauthor.com

To learn more about illustrator Donald Crews, visit:

http://www.kidsreads.com/authors/donald-crews

Creative Thinking Prompt: Building with Ice Cubes

Ice is slippery. Ice is wet. Ice melts. Then how can you build with ice?

Creative Thinking Prompt: Build a structure using ice cubes, using the creative thinking strategy SCAMPER. SCAMPER was developed by Bob Eberle based upon Alex Osborn’s creating thinking questions. Alex Osborn is the originator of brainstorming.

SCAMPER

Scamper is based upon seven creative thinking principles. Each principle views your idea in a different manner. By asking questions related to each principle, Scamper gets you thinking about which areas of your idea you can improve.

S = Substitute:  Remove some part and replace it with something else.

What else can I use instead of clear water to create ice cubes?

C = Combination:  Join or force together two or more elements of your subject to develop a solution.

What things can I combine together to make a better ice cube?

What can I use to stick the cubes together?

A = Adapt:  Change some part so that it works where before it didn’t work.

What might I do to change the structure of the ice cubes to make them not melt quickly?

M = Magnify or modify:  Consider the attributes of the subject and change them. Attributes include: size, shape, other dimensions, texture, color, position, etc.

How will smaller or larger ice cubes work within my structure?

P = Put to other uses:  Think about your subject – why it exists, what it is used for, what it’s supposed to do. Then think up new and unusual purposes.           

How else can I use an ice cube?

E = Eliminate:  Remove any or all elements of the subject.

What can I remove from my structure to make it stronger and last longer?

R = Rearrange or reverse:  Look at the subject from different perspectives. Turn it upside-down, inside-out. Make it go backwards, against the direction it was intended to go or be used. Similar to Reverse, modify the order of operations or any other hierarchy involved.

What would happen if I rearrange the ice cubes in my structure?

As I used SCAMPER more questions popped into my mind.

  • How would using pop, sugar water, jello, or millk affect the structure of an ice cube?
  • Would the different ingredients make the cube stick together easier? Would it melt less?
  • What if I let the cubes melt a little and then refreeze them – would my structure “stick” together?
  • How would small and large cubes help with building my structure?
  • Is there a better way to build an ice structure?
  • What if I froze a smaller cube inside a larger cube?
  • How can I make my structure colorful?

To make glow-in-the-dark cubes, visit: http://www.learnplayimagine.com/2012/02/glow-in-dark-water-beads.html

Think Deeper: Build an ice cube arch.