Tag Archives: visual storytelling

“Shhh… Imaginations at work”

“Shhh… Imaginations at work”

thewhisper

The Whisper

In The Whisper, a little girl is given a magical storybook, but the words have fallen out of the book. No words = no story, thought the girl until she studies the pictures in the book and begins to wonder. Soon her imagination takes flight and she invents her own stories.

The Whisper marries the elements of a wordless picture book with a text picture book to create a story within stories. Beautiful illustrations capture readers’ imaginations, prompting readers to use their storytelling skills to continue the story author/illustrator Pamela Zagarenski began. This book promotes discovery, wonder, imagination, and visual intelligence.

TITLE: The Whisper

AUTHOR: Pamela Zagarenski

ILLUSTRATOR: Pamela Zagarenski

PUBLISHER: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015

AGE GROUP: 4-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: discovery, wonder, imagination, visual intelligence

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) In the story, the girl titles the pictures to begin her stories.

thewhisperpageWhat title might you give this picture? Write a story to accompany this picture, adding your own illustrations.

2) Learning how to read pictures is an important literacy skill. Pick up a picture book and flip to any page. If there are words on the page, don’t read them. Instead you are going to read the picture. To get started, ask these questions.

-What do you see?

-Who are the character(s) in this picture?

-What are the characters doing and why are they doing it?

-Are they friends?

-What is going to happen next?

-What would you title this picture?

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about Pamela Zagarenski, visit: http://www.pzagarenski.com

Lost and Find Anew

somethingsivelost

Some Things I’ve Lost by Cybele Young

 somethinglostpageone

somethinglostpagetwo

Umbrella lost,

somethingslostpagethree

undergoing changes

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until final stage of transformation.

In Some Things I’ve Lost, every day objects, a hat, sunglasses, binoculars, are lost. Foldout pages feature each object’s metamorphosis as award-winning artist Cybele Young transforms these lost items into exquisite paper sculptures. “Readers will consider the inevitability of change and the power of imagination.” This book promotes creativity, imagination, inventive, and flexible thinking.

TITLE: Some Things I’ve Lost

AUTHOR: Cybele Young

Artwork by Cybele Young

PUBLISHER: Groundwood Books House of Anansi Press, 2015

AGE GROUP: 4-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: creativity, imagination, inventive, flexible thinking

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Discuss what metamorphosis is. How do animals go through the stages of change? How can these stages be applied to an invention?

2) Pick an everyday object like a fork. Transform this fork into something other its original purpose is.

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about Cybele Young, visit: http://www.cybeleyoung.ca

“What Can You Find in a Pool?”

“What Can You Find in a Pool?”

pool

Pool

Pool is a gorgeous, wordless picture book of curiosity, imagination and friendship. When two shy children meet at a pool, they embark upon a magical underwater journey. JiHyeon Lee’s use of negative space creates a silent movie for readers.

TITLE: Pool

AUTHOR: JiHyeon Lee

ILLUSTRATOR: JiHyeon Lee

PUBLISHER: Chronicle Books, 2015;  Originally Published in South Korea by Iyagikot Publishing Co., 2013

AGE GROUP: 3-7

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: curiosity, imagination

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Write about a time when you and your friend went on a journey.

2) Create an underwater creature that you might find in a pool.

3) What does being a friend mean to you? How might a fork and a spoon represent friendship? Think of an unusual object(s) that represents friendship.

4) Using two different colored construction papers, experiment with negative space and positive space. Below are examples of using negative and positive space to create an image.

mobydickBook Cover for Moby Dick incorporates the harpoon and the whale’s tail.

negativespace

Example of the use of negative space from designer Philipp Rietz

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about Jihyeon Lee’s writing process while she wrote Pool, visit:

http://blog.picturebookmakers.com/post/125243484756/jihyeon-lee