Creative Thinking Prompt: Ambigram Name

Creative Thinking Prompt: Invent your own font. Use this font to create an ambigram with your name.

Font is a design for a set of characters such as the alphabet using different sizes, italic, and bold. Typeface defines the shape of each character like when we use Arial and Comic Sans to add personality to our letters.

An ambigram is a word that is able to be interpreted from a different direction or perspective. Often used in graphic design, ambigrams play with optical illusions, symmetry and visual perception that include rotational, reflective, and 3-dimensional. A popular ambigram is when flipped horizontally or vertically, it still means the same.

Steps on how to make your own ambigram, visit:

https://designshack.net/articles/graphics/how-to-design-an-ambigram/

Lexie the Word Wrangler

Lexie the Word Wrangler”

Lexie wrangles words instead of cattle. She raises baby letters until they grow into words, lassos words together, herds words into sentences and hitches sentences together to tell a story.

When a rustler turns up, adding letters to words and making other words disappear, ruckus upsets life on the ranch.

The desert turns into a giant dessert.

A rainbow becomes a bow in the sky. Will Lexie capture the rustler?

This book promotes originality, humor, and clever.

TITLE: Lexie the Word Wrangler

AUTHOR: Rebecca Van Slyke

ILLUSTRATOR: Jessie Hartland

PUBLISHER: Nancy Paulsen Books, 2017

AGE GROUP: 6-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: originality, humor, clever

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) You can be a word wrangler, too!

* Rearrange each of these words to form new words. GRATE, SCOPE, APES, ART, ATOM

* Write a list of compound words. Break the words into two words. Write each word on a slip a paper and fold. Put each word into a bag. Select two slips of paper from the bag. Form a new compound word.

* Drop letters from words to form new words.

2) Write a list of 50 words on slips of paper. Fold and put into a bag. Pick 15 words from the bag. Create a short story, using these words. 

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Rebecca Van Slyke, visit:

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/authors/188927/rebecca-van-slyke

http://rebeccavanslyke.com/about-me/

To learn more about illustrator Jessie Hartland, visit:

http://jessiehartland.com

Creative Thinking Prompt: Colorforms® – A Timeless Toy

Creative Thinking Prompt: Colorforms® – A Timeless Toy

Since the 1950s, Colorforms® has been inspiring the imaginations of children. Back in 1951, two art students, Harry and Patricia Kislevitz, experimented with a new medium, a flexible vinyl material to use instead of paint. They bought rolls of colorful vinyl, cut out geometric shapes and stuck them to the walls of their bathroom. When guests came over to visit, they added to the Harry and Patricia’s bathroom art creation.

To learn more about Colorforms®, visit:

http://www.colorforms.com/history/

http://www.colorforms.com/videos/

The Invention Process

Step 1: Choose a problem

Step 2: Brainstorm solutions

Step 3: Background research

Step 4: Design and build

Step 5: Test and revise

Creative Thinking Prompt: Using the invention process, invent a new imagination game. After you design and build, have others play your game. What did they like about it? What did they think could be improved? Go back to the drawing board and revise your game again and again, trying out new ideas. What steps and risks did you take to invent something new? Good for you! Pat yourself on the back for persisting and trying something new!

I’m My Own Dog

I’m my own dog. No one owns me. I play fetch by myself. I roll over when I want to. I sit on my own.

But there’s this one spot on my back that I can’t scratch. I let this man scratch it and he followed me home.

Between you and me, I’m his best friend.

This book promotes humor and different perspective.

TITLE: I’m My Own Dog

AUTHOR: David Ezra Stein

ILLUSTRATOR: David Ezra Stein

PUBLISHER: Candlewick Press, 2014

AGE GROUP: 5-7

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: humor, different perspective

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Role-reversal. Pretend you are your mom or dad and she or he is you. Act out what takes place in the morning as each of you get ready for the day.

2) Make up a joke that a cat would tell another cat about a dog. Then invent a cat joke that a dog would tell another dog. 

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author/illustrator David Ezra Stein, visit:

http://www.penguin.com/static/pages/youngreaders/children/features/davidezrastein/

Creative Thinking Prompt: Turning Numbers into Cartoon Art

Creative Thinking Prompt: Turning Numbers into Cartoon Art

Pick a category such as robots, fish, trees, cars, breakfast, etc. Next starting with the number one (1), create a cartoon character for each number, 1–5. Make sure your number is “hidden”.

Think Deeper: Combine numbers to create animals.

Visit this webpage for tutorial and inspiration to transform numbers into animals:

http://www.drawinghowtodraw.com/stepbystepdrawinglessons/tag/number-drawing/

Learning Extensions:

Watch these brief videos that easily show how to turn numbers into cartoon birds:

How to turn Numbers 1-5 into the cartoon birds step by step

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOsZ4994Bmw

 How to turn Numbers 6-9 into the cartoon birds step by step

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FntooBiqbYs

7 Ate 9

7 Ate 9: The Untold Story”

Word on the street is that 7 ate 9 and 7 is after 6. Scared 6 hires a private investigator, Private I, to find missing 7.

Private I searches for 8, who knows zilch.

Next he heads to Café Uno and orders a slice pi. He still needs more data and finds 11, who tells him 7 went on vacation. Things don’t add up.

(endpaper)

Read the rest of the story for the clever, surprise ending.

This book promotes creativity, originality and discovery.

TITLE: 7 Ate 9: The Untold Story

AUTHOR: Tara Lazar

ILLUSTRATOR: Ross McDonald

PUBLISHER: Disney, Hyperion, 2017

AGE GROUP: 6-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: creativity, originality, discovery

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Using your favorite number and personification create a number character. Personification is giving human qualities or traits to something non-human. Sketch out your character. Then “dress” your character with color and textures.

2) Write your own fun mystery using these organizers from ReadWriteThink (http://www.readwritethink.org)

http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson865/organizer.pdf

http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson865/guide.pdf

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Tara Lazar, visit:

https://taralazar.com/about/

To learn more about illustrator Ross McDonald, visit:

https://www.ross-macdonald.com/childrens-books/

Creative Thinking Prompt: I See You

Creative Thinking Prompt: I See You

  First, brainstorm different ways that “I see you” can be interpreted.

 Second, combine.

Select from your list a few ways and combine them. Play around with these combinations. Have fun!

  Third, evaluate.

Which combination is most unusual? Which one creates emotion or an “aha” moment? Which one is “boring”? Which one has humor? Can a trait from one be substituted for a trait in another combination? Has you seen this done before? If so, how can you make it original?

 Fourth, elaborate.

Add details to your combination. Extend it.

These are some of my thoughts and where they led as I went through the creative process.

A) eyeball art; play on words I Sea You->  an image of the ocean in the iris of an eye

B) graffiti art; font; text message ICU ->  could mean an emergency room or combine with graffiti art to create images within the letters of ICU to create meaning for I See You

C) body movement; sign language ->  through a telescope or binoculars is an image of you in the sea

 Creative Thinking Prompt: How many ways can you create meaning for “I See You”?

everywhere, wonder

“everywhere, wonder

“I have a story to share. It is a gift from me to you.” everywhere, wonder written and illustrated by husband and wife team, Matthew Swanson and Robbi Behr share how places visited and things observed become a part of the story that makes up you. Readers travel to the moon, the pyramids, the canyon, a Zen garden and up North.

What do you wonder? What do you notice?

The places and things you see become a part of your story.

Look around you. There are wonders to be found. How are these a part of your story?

This book promotes discovery, imagination, wonder, inspire, and diversity.

TITLE: everywhere, wonder

AUTHOR: Matthew Swanson

ILLUSTRATOR: Robbi Behr

PUBLISHER: Macmillan Publishing Group, LLC, 2017

AGE GROUP: 5-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: discovery, imagination, wonder, inspire, diversity

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) At this very moment, look around you. What do you observe? Use your senses. How can you use what you observed to make it part of the story about you? Share your story.

2) Use your imagination. As you are walking along, you find something truly unique. Describe it. What does it do? What will you do with it?

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about this Matthew/author/husband and Robbi/illustrator/wife team, visit: http://robbiandmatthew.com

Creative Thinking Prompt: Surrealism

Creative Thinking Prompt: Surrealism

 Rene Magritte

Surrealism art is an art form that reunites the world of dream and fantasy with everyday reality, a mix of conscious and unconscious realms.

Artist Rene Magritte’s surrealism artwork challenges others, in an unexpected manner, to view his art not as it appears to be, but as it appears not. For Magritte, what is concealed is more important than what is open to view.

This art by Rene Magritte looks like a pipe but its translation is “This is not a pipe.”

Creative Thinking Prompt: If this is not a pipe, what else can it be?

Brainstorm alternate uses for this item. Develop a new name for this “pipe”.

Sidewalk Circus

Sidewalk Circus”

Sidewalk Circus, a wordless book, brings the Garibaldi Circus to town in an unusual way. No one notices these shadowy circus performers at a crowded bus stop except for a pair of children. Tight ropewalking construction workers. A juggling pancake flipping cook. The Flying Trapeze Brothers window washers.

This book promotes imagination, discovery, and flexible thinking.

TITLE: Sidewalk Circus

AUTHOR: Paul Fleischman

ILLUSTRATOR: Kevin Hawkes

PUBLISHER: Candlewick Press, 2004

AGE GROUP: 4-8

CREATIVE COMPONENTS: imagination, discovery, flexible thinking

LEARNING EXTENSIONS:

1) Make a list of forest animals. How can each animal’s shadow be a circus performer? For example, a duck flying up from the pond is the cannonball act.

2) How might you plan birthday party games as circus acts? Which circus act is your favorite?

EXTENDING CONNECTIONS:

To learn more about author Paul Fleischman, visit: http://www.paulfleischman.net/index.htm

To learn more about illustrator Kevin Hawkes, visit:

http://www.kevinhawkes.com/home.htm